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Car accident essays

Car accident essays



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Crash is a 1996 psychological thriller film written and directed by David Car accident essays based on J. Ballard’s 1973 novel of the same name.

The film generated considerable controversy upon its release and opened to mixed and highly divergent reactions from critics. While some praised the film for its daring premise and originality, others criticized its combination of graphic sexuality and violence. Their arousal is heightened by discussing the intimate details of their extramarital sex. She recounts sex that day with a stranger in a prop plane hangar, where she caresses the plane hull with her bare breast as the film’s opening scene. When Ballard replies he did not achieve satisfaction with his office sexual encounter that day, as he was interrupted, his wife replies “maybe the next one”. While driving home from work late one night, Ballard’s car collides head-on with another, killing its male passenger. While trapped in the fused wreckage, the driver, Dr.

Ballard when she pulls off the shoulder harness of her seat belt. Ballard’s shattered leg together and photographs it. Ballard becomes one of Vaughan’s followers who fetishize car crashes, obsessively watching car safety test videos and photographing traffic collisions. Ballard drives Vaughan’s Lincoln convertible around the city while Vaughan picks up and has sex with street prostitutes and, later, Ballard’s wife. Although Vaughan claims at first that he is interested in the “reshaping of the human body by modern technology,” in fact his project is to live out the philosophy that the car crash is a “benevolent psychopathology that beckons towards us. The film’s climax begins with Vaughan’s death in an intentional crash. It ends with another deliberate crash where Ballard rams his wife’s car, as she unbuckles her seat belt intentionally.

As he caresses her bruised body on the grass median near the crash, she replies that she is unhurt. As they lovingly copulate under the overturned car, the film ends with Ballard whispering in her ear, “Maybe the next one”, implying their fetish involves death. The film was extremely controversial, as was the book, because of its vivid depictions of graphic sexual acts instigated by violence. The controversial subject matter prompted The Daily Mail and The Evening Standard to orchestrate an aggressive campaign to ban Crash in the United Kingdom. The film was still banned by Westminster Council, meaning it could not be shown in any cinema in the West End, even though they had earlier given special permission for the film’s premiere, and it was easily seen in nearby Camden. An academic study of the controversy and audience responses to it, written by Martin Barker, Jane Arthurs and Ramaswami Harindranath, was published by Wallflower Press in 2001, entitled The Crash Controversy: Censorship Campaigns and Film Reception. The film received a mixed response from critics, albeit with some notable supporters.

Rotten Tomatoes based on 51 reviews, with an average score of 6. The consensus reads: “Despite the surprisingly distant, clinical direction, Crash’s explicit premise and sex is classic Cronenberg territory. In his contemporary review, Roger Ebert gave the film 3. Crash” is about characters entranced by a sexual fetish that, in fact, no one has. Cronenberg has made a movie that is pornographic in form, but not in result like a porno movie made by a computer: It downloads gigabytes of information about sex, it discovers our love affair with cars, and it combines them in a mistaken algorithm. The result is challenging, courageous and original–a dissection of the mechanics of pornography.



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